Storying: Concepts for future directions in career development research and practice

By Noah Dwain Arney (Cannexus22 GSEP Award Winner) In her book Pathways for Remembering and Recognizing Indigenous Thought in Education: Philosophies of Iethi'nihsténha Ohwentsia'kékha (Land), Sandra Styres explains that the purpose of stories is to make sense of “one’s place in the past in order to be in the present” (Styres 2017, 50). This use…

Counselling and the new world 

Zoée St-Amand  A year ago, I woke up in a new reality. Without warning, a virus showed up, disrupting everything in its path. Across the globe, all of us have been affected personally. The labour market has undeniably been shaken up and will undergo an unprecedented transformation. Workers have had to adapt thus far, but they…

Burnout of health-care professionals in the face of a pandemic 

Steeven Bernier  Over the past year, many of us have heard stories in the media about people who lost their jobs and retrained in order to help out in the health-care system. However, working conditions within the health-care sector seem to have deteriorated all over the world. Headlines announcing that nurses no longer want to work…

Career decision-making: could art therapy be an avenue to explore? 

By Hélène Brisebois (Cannexus22 GSEP Award Winner) Careers occupy a central place in people’s lives, and career decisions focus on finding a job that meets financial, social recognition and well-being needs (Blustein, 2008; Gati and Tal, 2008, Milot-Lapointe, 2017). To meet these needs, people choose careers that are in line with their interests and their goals (Gati, Krausz and Osipow, 1996; Milot-Lapointe, 2017). However, this…

Equitable career development: Dismantling sociocultural barriers that create disenfranchisement 

By Caileigh Wilson (Cannexus22 GSEP Award Winner) Recently, while teaching a workshop on reflective career planning, a student asked a question that left me without words: “If racism and discrimination exist within hiring panels, what are you doing about it?” This question was posed by a student who was in the process of applying for a job and who continued to experience…

Autism as an opportunity for untapped potential

By Andrea Vincent  Many revolutionary figures in history have been considered to have autism as a result of their abilities to think creatively, focus intently and challenge conventional thinking. The art of Michelangelo, actors like Sir Anthony Hopkins, musicians such as Mozart, life-changing inventions by Nikola Tesla, activists who have stood up in the face of adversity…

The truth will set you free: Why deception is not an effective strategy in job interviews

By Jordan Ho (Cannexus22 GSEP Award Winner) People are naturally driven to put their best foot forward during a job interview. There are times, however, when people perceive that being entirely honest will hurt their chances of securing the job, or they cannot provide a high-quality response to the interview questions. In these situations, some…

First-generation Canadians and career development – and their overly involved parents

By Kasi Sewraj “I thought I was the only one.” During one of my graduate courses on career development, our professor asked us to share our personal career journeys that led us to our counselling psychology program. I was very honest about how my family influenced my pathway to medical school, and I only recently…

Career development for those who experience persistent and severe mental illness

By Kristina Waldmann Imagine. Just for a moment. You belong to a group of people whose unemployment rates average between 70 to 90%. For those who experience persistent and serious mental illness (SMI), such rates are a harrowing reality (Marwaha, & Johnson, 2004). Among individuals with disabilities, the Canadian Mental Health Association purports that those…

Mental health practitioners as vessels: Self-care in relation to career development in a global pandemic

Lydie Masengo “If you don’t take time for your wellness, you will be forced to take time for your illness.” – Joyce Sunada It has been a year since our world has been changed since the onset of the pandemic, which has negatively affected many people’s mental health. Working as a crisis line responder and…

Aligning career services with the needs of students with learning disabilities

Michael Ford While studying at my mostly deserted university campus recently, another student asked if I was a professor, a question I get a lot as a mature student. The fact I am often older than my professors may have something to do with this, but that’s another story. After clarifying that I was a…

Why we should worry about interview anxiety

By Simonne Mastrella Job interviews are often met with feelings of nervousness or apprehension (McCarthy & Goffin, 2004). Considering that interviews are high-stakes situations, this experience of interview anxiety is far from surprising. It is, however, problematic for candidates. In addition to being unpleasant, considerable research has found that self-reported interview anxiety is associated with…

How working from home can offer more accessible careers for people with disabilities

Zhanna Lyubykh Work has many benefits. It provides structure, serves as a source of meaning and offers opportunities for social inclusion. Yet some groups of people are disadvantaged when it comes to finding meaningful careers. Despite labour legislation ensuring equal rights for all groups, research demonstrates that people with disabilities are two times more likely…

Enriching student’s lives through conversation

By Yi-Wen Liao Mental health is a big issue for first-year undergraduate students adapting to university life in recent years. Although my role is as a career coach, I have found the purely coaching approach may not be sufficient because students face many more challenges nowadays. Therefore, they need far more supports and experiences sharing.…

COVID-19: The Widening Cracks in Canada’s Social Safety Net Have Implications for Retraining

By Alix J. Jansen The COVID-19 pandemic is highlighting the cracks in Canada’s social safety net and revealing the various ways that social policies make it difficult for workforce development organizations to help those in need. Career development professionals do their best to help people navigate our changing labour market, but government policies can make…

Career Pathways After a Crisis for Youth

By Aryan Esgandanian In the month of March, COVID-19 disrupted the well-being of Canadians and people around the world. There have been different takeaways and learning outcomes unravelling from this pandemic. Different sectors are overwhelmed and in the future, the direction of policies will need to change to support those gaps. What has been uncovered…

Does Ontario set up persons living with bipolar disorder for career success?

By Margaret Janse van Rensburg The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5th edition (DSM-5) classifies bipolar and related disorders as disorders that cause mood fluctuations between a range of depressive states and manic states (Severus & Bauer, 2013). Persons living with bipolar disorder (BD) can have impaired occupational functioning, health-related quality of life and are at…

Disability in the Academy and the Academic Library Profession

By Anna Wilson The United Nations (UN) guiding principles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) includes non-discrimination, full participation and inclusion in society (UNCRPD, 2014, para. 9). Unfortunately, many scholars with disabilities are not represented in the academic and library staff in universities. Ableism conceptualizes the superior human condition, connecting…

Creating Need-Based Opportunities and Job Roles To Fight High Teacher Turnover Rates

By Qurratulain Anjum As a teacher, I have witnessed high intentions to quit among my colleagues, with an even higher teacher turnover rate globally. Around 46-50% of the teachers quit within the first five years of teaching in the United States (Jalongo & Heider, 2006), 30% in Australia (Peters & Pearce, 2012) and 20-40% in…

Employment agencies’ roles in mitigating the impact of layoffs

By Naomi Abrahams In Canada, the second-largest population of residents are those between the ages of 45 and 64 years old, totalling approximately 10.16 million Canadians (Statistics Canada, 2020). We have seen an increased number of individuals above the age of 55 participating in the workforce, from 15.5% in 2006 to 18.7 %  in 2011…

Academic supervision and the global knowledge economy

By Nadine Bekkouche For many years now, higher education policy has noted the importance of training students for the competitive global knowledge economy. Enrolments in graduate programs have increased, and are projected to continue increasing. But the success of graduate training in producing high-value workers is debatable. Many graduates of competitive research programs struggle to…

Career Counselling, Gen Z and Their Sometimes Very Involved Parents

By Janet Payne (Cannexus21 GSEP Award Winner) Since beginning my counselling career in 2006, I have noticed some fairly significant changes in the relationships between young adults and their parents, with the most obvious change being the increased frequency in the number of parents, often mothers, who accompany their young adult children to career counselling…

Career development crucial for employers and employees

By Fauzia Farzana Infatuation for work and determination are key elements in accomplishing one’s goals. My passion for managing people has driven me to pursue higher studies in human resources management. Career development is directly linked to the goals and objectives set by an individual. It starts with self-actualization and self-assessment of one’s interests and…

A call for social work theory in the expansion of the ‘Peter Principle’

By Genevieve Harte The “Peter Principle” has been around for decades. This is the theory that employees get promoted to their level of incompetence and are then left in a position where they no longer excel. Work and workplaces are rapidly changing, the need for work-life balance is ever increasing and employees’ mental health is…

Don’t ask, I’ll tell: Disability disclosure during job search and in the workplace

By Roxy Merkand (Cannexus21 GSEP Award Winner) Invisible disabilities include conditions that have no visible manifestation or have visible features not clearly connected to a disability (Santuzzi, Waltz, Finkelstein, & Rupp, 2014). Individuals with invisible disabilities choose how to disclose their disabilities in work-related domains (Ragins, 2008; Clair, Beatty, & MacLean, 2005). However, researchers have…

Employment: A Key Determinant of Newcomer Youth Integration?

By Temitope Abiagom Immigrant young adults are an important source of talent for the Canadian economy as they account for almost half of the total migration population (Statistics Canada, 2017). This cohort of migrants is often favoured by immigration programs that aim to fill labour shortages and redress Canada’s aging workforce. While the integration and…

Maintaining work-life balance in a post-COVID-19 world

By Mohit Bassi The present spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) will have a greater societal impact than the 9/11 terrorist bombings in New York (Atkeson, 2020; Gerber, 2020). A large part of the global efforts to curtail COVID-19 involves staying at home to stop the spread of the pandemic (Sajed & Amgain, 2020). This sudden…

Crisis Management: Identifying Effective Leadership Competencies During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By Nkem Onyegbula In today’s global market, organizations continue to face several business challenges from changes ranging from economic downsizing, the drop in oil and gas prices, climate change, globalization, continuously changing technology to stringent cross-border policies. However, nothing has been more challenging than the impact of the recent COVID-19 pandemic, which will and has…

How to help the “Homo Economicus” in the Career Office

By Taylor Witiw “What program can I finish in the shortest amount of time, that will give me the highest income when I am done (referred herein as -time/+money)?” This is the question that prospective students bring to my institute most frequently. It is a real question and always honest, but as a career development…

Navigating My Professional Identity as a Social Justice-Oriented Counsellor: “The Professional is Political”

By Walaa Taha “Education is our passport to the future” – Malcom X As the daughter of immigrant parents, the arduous struggles my parents endured to provide me with a “better passport to the future” is what underlies my dedication to pursue counselling and support others in their educational and career journeys. However, what if…