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Adding its voice to the call for stronger, positive relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, CERIC has joined a group of Canada’s leading philanthropic organizations in signing a Declaration of Action, committing to ensuring that positive action on reconciliation will continue.

The Declaration was first issued in June of 2015 and coincided with the closing events of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). The TRC, headed by Justice Murray Sinclair, spent six years hearing the truth about Canada’s Indian Residential Schools and establishing a reconciliation process that will lead to better relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples of Canada. The Counselling Foundation of Canada, which established and continues to fund CERIC, was among the first Declaration signatories.

Land acknowledgement

In the spirit and intent of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s recommendations, we acknowledge the traditional Indigenous territories on which we gather at the beginning of all meetings at CERIC’s office as well as at our events that take place in other communities across the country. By learning, understanding and acknowledging, we wish to pay respect to the long and rich Indigenous history of Canada.

The following statement is CERIC’s land acknowledgement of the traditional Indigenous territories of the city we now call Toronto:

CERIC acknowledges the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Haundenosaunee, Anishinaabe and Mississauga Anishinaabe of New Credit share a special relationship to the territory in which our office is located. Toronto’s long history of being a meeting place and centre of trade & commerce began thousands of years ago. Today, it is home to Indigenous Peoples from across Turtle Island and many who have come from away. We are grateful to have the opportunity to work in this territory and commit ourselves to learning the truth of our shared history and to engage in the process of reconciliation.

What else is CERIC doing?

CERIC plans to use its platforms and networks to support the fulfillment of the vision of Indigenous peoples, to building a fairer and more just country. We are working to engage Canada’s career development community in this journey of reconciliation through our education and research work and our collaborations, believing that career development professionals have an important role to play in their connections with students and with diverse communities in building a more inclusive future for all.

Among initial steps, we have added Indigenous Cultural Competence training as well as brought the KAIROS blanket exercise to our annual Cannexus National Career Development Conference.

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