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Improving Social Determinants of Health and Policy Capacity on the Issues facing Foreign Skilled Immigrants’ Integration into the Credentialized Canadian Workforce System

By Juliet Obianuju Bushi Canada’s population is in an all-time high, thanks to its rich and ever growing immigrant population. In 2009, Canada welcomed 252,179 new immigrants (principal applicants and dependents), an increase of two per cent compared to 2008, (Government of Saskatchewan, 2009). The largest group, equivalent to 153,498, or 61 per cent of…

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The Dire Situation of Skilled Immigrants in Canada: A Former Employment Counsellor’s Perspective

By David Marulanda Skilled immigrants comprise a significant portion of the population in our country (Statistics Canada, 2017). Their successful settlement in Canada largely hinges on finding employment commensurate with their professional experience. Nevertheless, skilled immigrants face barriers such as stringent accreditation requirements and lack of recognition of foreign credentials that lead them to unemployment…

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The Double Edge Sword: Rethinking the Benefits of Delayed Gratification & Its Potential Contribution to Work-Life Conflict and Career Burnout

By Brittany Shields In the past delayed gratification, identified as the ability to postpone immediate gratification for long term rewards, was viewed as an ability with only positive correlates such as academic achievement, high SAT scores, few behaviour problems and higher rates of college completion and income (Mischel, Ebbesen, Zeiss, 1972; Mischel, Shoda & Peake,…

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Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Calling: Sexual Orientation as a Potential Moderating Variable

By Cassidy Wilson LGBTQ individuals continue to be some of the most misrepresented and marginalized groups of people within society, and the workforce today (Köllen, 2015; Marrs & Staton, 2016; Myung & Park, 2016). My proposed area of research involves an investigation of the connections between self-efficacy and people’s sense of calling, with a focus…

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How Much Agency Do We Think We Have?

By Mirit Grabarski The early career theories (Holland, 1985; Law, 1981; Lent, Brown & Hackett, 1994; Super,1990) focused on person-job fit, self-concept, and multiple roles that one takes during the lifetime, with the traditional linear career path in mind. With the technological, economic and social changes in the late 20th century, a new generation of…

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Occupational Change: On the Horns of A Dilemma

By Duygu Biricik Gulseren Occupation, as used by careers researchers and practitioners, refers to a set of duties that require similar skills (International Labor Office, 1990). When people change occupations, they change the skill sets they use to make a living. Most of the time, they need to gain new skills to be eligible for…

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Community-Based Workers: A Practitioner-Researcher’s Agenda

By Angela M. Contreras Community workers are those who provide direct or indirect services to or for the benefit of members of vulnerable communities. Some are paid, some are unpaid. Some are full-time employees, others are part-timers. Some occupy permanent positions, others are short-term contract employees. Some are men, most are women. I also consider necessary…

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